Same Page Media Reviews: The Imitation Game

I am able to type this blog post because of Alan Turing. My books, now available in many fine Internet retailers, are available as such because of Alan Turing.

As with all reviews, I offer this simple spoiler warning.

There are so many people that I wish I had known when it was the right time to thank them for having an influence on my life. But Alan Turing died well before I was born, so all I can do is thank him in my thoughts and prayers, and silently curse the outdated laws of the era that essentially led to his death.

The Imitation Game is the biopic of Alan Turing, played by Benedict Cumberbatch, the man who is credited as the father of modern computers. It was based on the book Alan Turing: The Enigma and the screenwriter won the Oscar for best screen adaptation that year.

As with any film that is based on a true story, there’s always going to be a bit of gray area in regards to accuracy. Benedict Cumberbatch is obviously used to portraying a socially inept genius with a brilliant mind and a unique set of talents suited to the job, and while his portrayal of Turing is different from Sherlock in many ways, you can almost sense the parts where he is bringing his experience with the latter to the former.

Then you get Allen Leach, who plays a Soviet Double agent. Aside from the era of the movie, there’s very little difference between this and the rebellious Tom Branson character in Downton Abbey. He’s a great actor, but the roles are so similar that you would be forgiven for thinking that he is typecast here.

Over all, this is a beautiful story. Alan’s struggles to earn the respect and friendship of his team are real and believable. The non-linear storytelling is effective as it juggles his childhood, his work on cracking the Enigma code, and his eventual persecution at the hands of Scotland yard for his homosexuality.

You can learn more about The Imitation Game and Alan Turing on The Nerdest Podcast’s interview with Benedict Cumberbatch. 

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